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Upper Windy Creek Patrol Cabin, Denali National Park From the Park Service
“The upper Windy Creek Patrol Cabin was completed on June 30, 1931. “Two old Swedes”, contracted carpenters for the National Park Service, built this cabin. The “Two old Swedes” built several cabins in the park including Sushana, Lower Savage, Lower Toklat, Riley Creek, Lower Windy and Moose Creek. Although there is little known history about the “two old Swedes”, they were certainly excellent craftsmen.
In 1929, Superintendent Harry Lick determined that boundary patrol cabins were essential. Prior to using cabins, rangers on winter patrol hauled heavy canvas tents and wood burning stoves with them on their sleds. The use of cabins not only reduced sled weight, it allowed more time to be spent on the trail. In March of 1931, Chief Ranger Lou Corbley and Ranger Grant Pearson cut the logs for this cabin on site and freighted other materials in by dog team from the railway in Cantwell. One of four cabins built in 1931, this cabin was built on the original boundary of the original Mt McKinley National Park to provide Rangers with shelter in their efforts illegal hunting and trapping within the park. The nine patrol cabins that were built between 1930 and 1935 replaced many older cabins that were falling into disrepair. They provided shelter at intervals of a day
From the Park Service “The upper Windy Creek Patrol Cabin was completed on June 30, 1931. “Two old Swedes”, contracted carpenters for the National Park Service, built this cabin. The “Two old Swedes” built several cabins in the park including Sushana, Lower Savage, Lower Toklat, Riley Creek, Lower Windy and Moose Creek. Although there is little known history about the “two old Swedes”, they were certainly excellent craftsmen. In 1929, Superintendent Harry Lick determined that boundary patrol cabins were essential. Prior to using cabins, rangers on winter patrol hauled heavy canvas tents and wood burning stoves with them on their sleds. The use of cabins not only reduced sled weight, it allowed more time to be spent on the trail. In March of 1931, Chief Ranger Lou Corbley and Ranger Grant Pearson cut the logs for this cabin on site and freighted other materials in by dog team from the railway in Cantwell. One of four cabins built in 1931, this cabin was built on the original boundary of the original Mt McKinley National Park to provide Rangers with shelter in their efforts illegal hunting and trapping within the park. The nine patrol cabins that were built between 1930 and 1935 replaced many older cabins that were falling into disrepair. They provided shelter at intervals of a day's dog mush apart. The cabin replaced an older ranger-built cabin, erected in 1926, which essentially caved in. Today, the cabin remains historically significant because it is in its original location, has few exterior alterations, exhibits local rustic building techniques, and retains its original function. Rangers continue to use the cabin in winter during extended dog sled patrols and in the summer during backcountry patrols. Te cabin was built of peeled round spruce logs with round saddle notches displaying excellent craftsmanship. The 12' x 14' single story, single room cabin in 10'8” from floor to ridgepole. The chinking (between-log insulation) was done with sawed wood strips and over oakum. The roof was built of peeled poles covered with sod and corrugated steel. The windows appear to be original. In 1959 a section of the roof was replaced. In 1977, the collapsing root cellar was filled. The floor joists were replaced creosote stock and the floor boards were replaced with ¾' plywood.”

 

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